Top Quotes from Evangelism and the Sovereignty of God

Evangelismandthesovereignty

JI Packer's Book Evangelism and the Sovereignty of God is a incredible work that takes on the perceived tension between Calvinism and Evangelistic urgency.  Packer proves that the two are not enemies but friends.  He argues that a robust, Biblical, understanding of the sovereignty of God rightly fuels evangelistic effort and provides hope and boldness to the evangelist.  It is an incredible work, brief and to the point.  If you have wrestled with God's Sovereignty and Evangelism (and who hasn't) be sure to give this book a read.  It is well worth your time.  Here were some top quotes I picked out in my reading to give you a taste of what this book has to offer you.  You can pick up the book at Amazon Here.

There is abroad today a widespread suspicion that a robust faith in the absolute sovereignty of God is bound to undermine any adequate sense of human responsibility. Such a faith is thought to be dangerous to spiritual health, because it breeds a habit of complacent inertia. In particular, it is thought to paralyze evangelism by robbing one both of the motive to evangelize and of the message to evangelize with.

I shall try to show further that, so far from inhibiting evangelism, faith in the sovereignty of God's government and grace is the only thing that can sustain it, for it is the only thing that can give us the resilience that we need if we are to evangelize boldly and persistently, and not be daunted by temporary setbacks. So far from being weakened by this faith, therefore, evangelism will inevitably be weak and lack

The desire to oversimplify the Bible by cutting out the mysteries is natural to our perverse minds, and it is not surprising that even good people should fall victim to it.

We must not at any stage forget that. For if we forget that it is God's prerogative to give results when the gospel is preached, we shall start to think that it is our responsibility to secure them. And if we forget that only God can give faith, we shall start to think that the making of converts depends, in the last analysis, not on God, but on us, and that the decisive factor is the way in which we evangelize.

And the point that we must see is this: only by letting our knowledge of God's sovereignty control the way in which we plan, and pray, and work in his service, can we avoid becoming guilty of this fault. For where we are not consciously relying on God, there we shall inevitably be found relying on ourselves. And the spirit of self-reliance is a blight on evangelism.

He who does not devote himself to evangelism in every way that he can is not, therefore, playing the part of a good and faithful servant of Jesus Christ.

In other words, evangelism is the issuing of a call to turn, as well as to trust; it is the delivering, not merely of a divine invitation to receive a Savior, but of a divine command to repent of sin.

The results of preaching depend, not on the wishes and intentions of men, but on the will of God Almighty

We never know what sin really is till we have learned to think of it in terms of God, and to measure it, not by human standards, but by the yardstick of his total demand on our lives. What we have to grasp, then, is that the bad conscience of the natural man is not at all the same thing as conviction of sin. It does not, therefore, follow that a man is convicted of sin when he is distressed about his weaknesses and the wrong things he has done. It is not conviction of sin just to feel miserable about yourself and your failures and your inadequacy to meet life's demands. Nor would it be saving faith if a man in that condition called on the Lord Jesus Christ just to soothe him, cheer him up and make him feel confident again.

In our own presentation of Christ's gospel, therefore, we need to lay a similar stress on the cost of following Christ, and make sinners face it soberly before we urge them to respond to the message of free forgiveness. In common honesty, we must not conceal the fact that free forgiveness, in one sense, will cost everything; or else our evangelizing becomes a sort of confidence trick.

It is a tragic and ugly thing when Christians lack desire, and are actually reluctant, to share the precious knowledge that they have with others whose need of it is just as great as their own. It was natural for Andrew, when he found the Messiah, to go off and tell his brother Simon, and for Philip to hurry to break the good news to his friend Nathanael (Jn 1:40ff.). They did not need to be told to do this; they did it naturally and spontaneously, just as one would naturally and spontaneously share with one's family and friends any other piece of news that vitally affected them. There is something very wrong with us if we do not ourselves find it natural to act in this way: let us be quite clear about that.

We should not be held back by the thought that if they are not elect, they will not believe us, and our efforts to convert them will fail. That is true; but it is none of our business and should make no difference to our action.

Were it not for the sovereign grace of God, evangelism would be the most futile and useless enterprise that the world has ever seen, and there would be no more complete waste of time under the sun than to preach the Christian gospel.

Paul's confidence should be our confidence too. We may not trust in our methods of personal dealing or running evangelistic services, however excellent we may think them. There is no magic in methods, not even in theologically impeccable methods. When we evangelize, our trust must be in God who raises the dead.

God can make his truth triumphant to the conversion of the most seemingly hardened unbeliever. You and I will never write off anyone as hopeless and beyond the reach of God if we believe in the sovereignty of his grace.

Should We Have Altar Calls?

The great preacher Dr. Martin Lloyd-Jones had the practice of not having altar calls at the end of his sermons.  Today, it is a practice that takes place almost every Sunday in many of our churches today.  The practice of altar calls is a relatively new idea in the history of Christianity.  Charles Finny began to practice them as we know them today during the 2nd great awakening.  As a result, we need to think carefully about the practice.  In his book Preaching and Preachers, Dr. Jones lists out his reasons why he never did alter calls.  I share them with you in hopes that they might challenge your thinking like they did my own.  The following are the Doctor’s arguments for not doing altar calls:

  1. It is wrong to put direct pressure on the will.
  2. Too much pressure on the will is dangerous, because in the end the man may come forward because he has been swayed by the personality of the preacher, but has not been swayed by the truth.
  3. The preaching and the Word and the call for decision should not be separate in our thinking
  4. The method of altar calls carries the implication that sinners have an inherent power of decision and of self-conversion.
  5. There is an implication here that the evangelist somehow is in a position to manipulate the Holy Spirit and His work.
  6. Alter calls tend to produce a superficial conviction of sin, if any at all.
  7. By having alter calls you are encouraging people to think that their act of going forward somehow saves them.
  8. Does it not raise the whole question of the doctrine of regeneration?

The opinionated preacher from Wales is bound to step on some of our toes.  I encourage you to buy the whole book and read it.  It is fantastic.  What do you think? Do you disagree with the Doctor on altar calls? Why?  What are the dangers of practicing altar calls?  I’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments.

A Word of Advice for Students from Richard Baxter

Many students and teachers are currently getting geared up for school starting in just a few weeks. Many will be starting college for the first time exploring the intricacies of molecular biology, the beautiful rhythmic language of William Shakespeare, or the complexities of philosophy.   Richard Baxter wrote in his book The Reformed Pastor the following quote which hopefully will challenge you to seek God in all areas of study.  It does not matter if the pursuit is science, mathematics, literature, communications, arts, or religion itself.  The pursuit of academic excellence is a great and noble task, however it must be fueled with our desire to know and cherish God.  If not, it is all folly.  Here is the quote:

Your study of physics and other sciences is not worth a rush, if it be not God that you seek after in them. To see and admire, to reverence and adore, to love and delight in God, as exhibited in his works - this is the true and only philosophy; the contrary is mere foolery, and is so called again and again by God himself. This is the sanctification of your studies, when they are devoted to God, and when he is the end, the object, and the life of them all.

And, therefore, I shall presume to tell you, by the way, that it is a grand error, and of dangerous consequence in Christian academies, that they study the creature before the Redeemer, and set themselves to physics, and metaphysics, and mathematics, before they set themselves to theology; whereas, no man that hath not the vitals of theology, is capable of going beyond a fool in philosophy. Theology must lay the foundation, and lead the way of all our studies.