Not Your Typical Manger Scene

When December arrives trees go up, decorations are strung, and gifts are purchased to celebrate the Christmas season. We go to party after party, eating cookie after cookie, to celebrate with our co-workers and friends. The busyness of Christmas hums along and it often isn’t until this week, the week of Christmas that things begin to slow down a bit. As kids get out of school, the Christmas parties complete, and the shopping list checked-off, now we can truly reflect on what makes Christmas so absolutely astonishing—the incarnation of God. christmas-jesus-pictures-hhmj99kf

The Mystery of the Incarnation

When we look to the Gospel we are astonished by its beauty and mystery. Yet, perhaps the most mysterious things is what actually happens on that first Christmas. God became a man. The Great I Am permanently wedded himself to humanity in the person of Jesus Christ. The son entered into his creation and was born in the most humblest yet extraordinary of circumstances.

Consider how demeaning it was for the eternal God to become a man. God has existed as trinity, Father, Son, and Spirit for all of eternity. But yet, in order to save us, God became one of us. Immanuel is his name. God decided to step into his creation. He stooped down from the glory heaven and entered into the earth as a man. At Jesus’ incarnation, the transcendent God becomes the immanent God. He becomes one of us.

Yet, the transcendent, majestic God of the universe stepped from the splendor of heaven and put on flesh and dwelt among us. Perhaps the greatest mystery in the whole Bible is the incarnation of Christ! Who could of imagined that God would do such a thing? To put on humanity would seem to be beneath him, but yet the God of love came to serve us by becoming one of us.

It Was Not a Silent Night

We tend to romanticize that first Christmas. Our manager scenes in our homes are quaint and clean. The reality of that night was different than the picture in our heads. Jesus came in a filthy stable, littered with the stench of animal excrement, and the rumbling noise of a barn. The arrival of Jesus wasn’t spectacular, but of lowliest proportions. That’s exactly what made it so extraordinary, God arrived into his creation not on a throne made of gold but a manager made of wood. The Christ-child came in the most unsanitary of conditions. “He had no form or majesty that we should look at him, and no beauty that we should desire him.”[1. Isaiah 53:2, ESV]

On Andrew Peterson’s incredible Christmas Album Behold the Lamb of God there is a beautiful track called Labor of Love the opening verse goes like this:

It was not a silent night

There was blood on the ground

You could hear a woman cry

In the alleyways that night

On the streets of David’s town

And the stable was not clean

And the cobblestones were cold

And little Mary full of grace

With the tears upon her face

Had no mother’s hand to hold

But yet, this was the way Jesus came to save. He came not as an entitled king, but the humblest of servants. Jesus did not come for the elite, he came for the nobodies, the rejects, and the failures. God, filled with empathy for his creation, identifies with us and becomes one of us. Immanuel is his name.

Remember, that Christ humbled himself in this way and took a form of a servant, for you and for me. By far the greatest gift we’ve ever received was the gift of God that first Christmas morning. It was the gift of himself. Do you know him? Have you experienced his love? Have you accepted him or have you rejected him? He suffered for you. He was lowly for you. He serves you. Glory in such truths as we worship the Christ child this Christmas.