You are Too Rich to be a Scrooge

Christmas is the most wonderful time of the year. At least, that’s how the song goes. As I’m getting older, it seems like Christmas keeps coming around faster and faster. The Scrooge in within me sometimes utters, “Bah Humbug, Christmas again?” Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, has become a classic story at Christmas time. It has been adapted many times to film. Towards the beginning of the story, Scrooge has a conversation with his nephew. His nephew comes into his office and says Merry Christmas! Scrooge responds, “Merry Christmas! What right have you to be merry? What reason have you to be merry? You’re poor enough.” His nephew joyfully responds, “Come, then, what right have you to be dismal? What reason have you to be morose? You’re rich enough.” Too-Rich-to-be-a-Scrooge-Post-Image

As Christians, we are too rich not to be merry this time of year. Though we might not have earthly wealth, we have been blessed with every spiritual gift in the heavenly places. We have been lavished with the riches of God’s grace. Because, for those in Christ, we understand the true significance and the true wonder of Christmas: the light of the world has come and that, “The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness had not overcome it” (John 1:5).

Jesus not only enters into the darkness, but he overcomes the darkness! He slays our enemy. He rescues us from destruction. He absolves the darkness. How does Jesus overcome the darkness? Here are four ways Jesus overcomes the darkness.

1. He overcomes through his life as he is unstained by the darkness.

Every potential hero that emerges in the Old Testament falls victim to the darkness. No matter how much good they do, there are always horrible failures. From Abraham to Moses to David, no one is righteous, no not one. Yet, Jesus, the son of God, enters as the light of the world and he is unstained by the darkness. He does not succumb to temptation, but rather he overcomes it. Though tempted in ever way as we are, he is without sin. Where we all fail to meet the demands of God’s righteous law, Jesus fulfilled it. He fulfilled it not only through outward obedience, but through the internal motivations of his heart. He is holy, undefiled by sin. Where the first Adam fell to temptation in the garden of Eden, the new and better Adam in the Garden of Gethsemane crushed the serpent and overcome temptation. Jesus, the good son and the true Israel, obeyed where others failed. Throughout his life Jesus was unstained by the darkness.

2. He overcomes through his death as he is swallowed up by the darkness.

The perfect son of God was sent into this world as the light of the world, to die in the place of sinners. At the cross Jesus was swallowed up by the darkness, though he remains light. It was there on the cross that the full penalty for sin was poured out on Christ. “For our sake he made him to be sin who knew no sin, so that in him we might become the righteousness of God.” (2 Corinthians 5:21, ESV). So Jesus paid the penalty for our rebellion. He paid the price for our ransom. By his stripes we are healed. Matthew tells us in his Gospel that at the time of Jesus’ death darkness covered the whole land, indicating God’s judgment on his son as he bore the punishment for sin. Jesus overcame as he willingly laid down his life and was engulfed in the darkness of the cross—which is the great display of human sin and God’s judgment of it.

3. Jesus overcomes through his resurrection as he defeats the darkness.

The glory of the light of the world is that he did not stay dead. Though he was swallowed by the darkness, he was not defeated by it. Rather, on the third day he rose again in victory in resurrected new life. The suffering servant overcame and our great enemy was defeated. The lamb of God who was slain rose as the victorious lion of Judah. Yes, he died, but he rose again! The grand plan of God fixes the broken world through the life, death, and resurrection of Christ.

4. Jesus overcomes through his return as he achieves victory over the darkness.

Just as the light of the world entered into the world the first time as a baby born in Bethlehem, so too will the resurrected Jesus return at the end of days. He has put the fatal blow on sin and death, but will one-day return to establish his kingdom on the earth, defeating the powers of darkness once and for all. The consummation of his kingdom is coming. This is so important because the significance of the first advent can only be understood in light of the second. Jesus’ first coming is so important, because it points us to his final coming. The King will return for his throne. The husband will come back for his bride. The light will remove the darkness.

You’re Rich Enough to be Merry

Isn’t this what Christmas is all about? Even now as we sit in the sorrows of our suffering, isn’t our hope in Christ? Even now as we may groan in pain, our hope is in the light of the world who will return in victory over the darkness! Yes, darkness may surround us now, but the victory is already one. The light of the world has come and defeated sin and death, and he will come again. The significance of the first advent can only be understood in light of the second. This Christmas, you may be wondering is God fixing this broken world? The answer is yes—look at Bethlehem. Look at the God of light who became one of us to rescue us. The baby boy Jesus is the crucified son of God. The crucified son of God is the resurrected King. The resurrected King is the rider on the white horse who brings about the victory of the God!

So I’m not sure if you are in the Christmas spirit or not. Perhaps today you feel a bit like Scrooge inquiring, “What have you to be merry about, your poor enough, your suffering enough, you’re in pain enough, your hurting enough?” If you are a Christian this morning, I would simply reply back to you the same way Scrooge’s nephew replied to him, “Come, then, what right have you to be dismal? What reason have you to be morose? You’re rich enough.” For, “The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness had not overcome it.”